Tips For Creating A Garden For A Warmer Climate

According to data from the Horticultural Trades Association, over two-thirds of British adults enjoy visiting a garden centre every year. This just goes to show how much the British love gardening. However, if you’ve recently moved from the UK to warmer parts of the world like Spain, you will have to change the way you garden.

Here are simple ways to create a garden for a warmer climate:

 

Research about the soil

Garden For A Warmer Climate

Photo: Pixabay

The main soil type in Spain is clay. In the UK, clay is one of the most difficult soils to work with, but in Spain, it actually works really well. Droughts and extreme heat are much less damaging on clay soil than any other type of soil, which makes it easier for plants to germinate and grow healthily. The rainfall in Spain is also less than what Britain gets in a year, so your garden won’t be wet, clogged, and unmanageable.

Understand climactic changes

Climate patterns change frequently in most Mediterranean regions, which means in some areas summers could have rainstorms, while in others there could be extended periods of drought. It’s important to learn about the weather patterns where you live so you can effectively choose which seeds to plant.

Pick the right plants

Garden For A Warmer Climate

Photo: Pixabay

The Mediterranean Garden Society has a list of some of the best hot weather plants you can easily grow in your new garden. One great example is Aloysia gratissima (known in southern Spain as La Faborita), which grows six to nine inches tall. It thrives in well-drained soil, and come spring its white flowers bloom to give your garden a calming vanilla smell. You can also plant some Bush Morning Glory, which has a beautiful, snowy lavender flower that blooms in summer.

Succulents are also a great choice. They grow best in places with sweltering heat and require very little maintenance. They also come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and colours. You can spread them throughout your garden and even use them as decorations indoors.

The hot weather also makes it ideal to grow a huge variety of vegetables—from cabbages to root veggetables like carrots, parsnips, potatoes, artichokes, and beetroots. 

Build a reliable water system

Garden For A Warmer Climate

Photo: Pexels

If you don’t water your plants regularly they will dry up fast, so make sure the water system you choose is reliable and efficient.

Watch out for plant pests and diseases

Garden For A Warmer Climate

Photo: Pixabay

Remember that the warmer climate makes your plants more prone to pests and diseases. The head of RHS Advisory Services Guy Barter explained to the BBC that you need to choose your plants carefully to work with your gardening environment. Decompose your compost properly so that it doesn’t attract flies. Make sure you have a place for it where you can aerate and water it easily. Gardening experts say the larvae of the rose chafer beetle are often found in compost, and although they are not generally harmful to every plant in your garden, they can damage the plants you are growing in pots.

Protect yourself and your guests from the sun

 

Photo: Pixabay

You can’t very well enjoy your hard work if you can’t sit in your garden with a cool glass of wine and marvel at your blooming flowers. Take the warm weather as an opportunity to get the cosiest pieces of outdoor furniture, and create an inviting garden where you can entertain guests and have BBQs. Pergolas and gazebos are ideal for entertaining and will also be a nice focal point. Some of the pergolas on Screwfix are open air, and come with additional gazebo kits. A covered gazebo is preferable as it will provide good cover from the sun during the day and add to the overall look of your garden. You can also add climbing plants to the structure to make your chill out spots look even more attractive.

It’s also maybe worth considering joining gardening and home interior design events to get more inspiration about the best garden designs that work for the warmer weather. We wrote about one of the most sought-after events in Estepona, which featured a lot of practical advice from local Mediterranean gardeners and interior designers. Be sure to check if any of these events are happening near you. As long as you have all the right tools, there’s no limit to what you can do in your summer garden, especially if the weather is nice and sunny.

10 Currency Exchange Tips: To Exchange Currencies at A Top Rate, when You Move to Spain

Do you intend to move to Spain with your family this year, and maybe buy a property? If so, you’ll already be thinking about sitting on the beach, soaking up the sun, with a tall glass of sangria by your side. That said, before you can get working on your tan and enjoy la vida española, you’ll need to sort through some practical things and pay attention to our Currency Exchange Tips.

For example, how can you transfer your money from the UK to your Spanish bank account at a top exchange rate? Well, to ensure you maximise your euro total, and start your new family life in Spain on the best foot, please find below 10 easy tips. Keep these in mind, and exchanging currencies to move to Spain will be ¡muy facil!

cost of living in spain

Our 10 Currency Exchange Tips:

1. Plan your money transfer well in advance.

Are you thinking about moving to Spain with your family in the next few months? If so, start looking at transferring money to your Spanish bank account now.

This is because, the sooner you look at exchanging currencies, the bigger the window you give yourself for an outstanding exchange rate to become available!

2. Talk to a friendly, professional currency dealer.

Is this your first time transferring a significant sum of money to Spain? If so, speak to a friendly, professional currency dealer.

He or she will explain the process and answer your questions in straightforward language, without any jargon. This way, you can put your mind at ease.

3. Transfer your money with a foreign exchange broker, instead of your bank.

When we transfer money to Spain, it’s tempting to use our local bank. The thing is though, the banks know this, so they offer inferior exchange rates.

Instead, a foreign exchange broker can get you a significantly better currency rate, to make moving to Spain with your family a breeze.

4. Accept a good exchange rate as soon as it arises.

When you exchange currencies, our impulse is often to wait and see how high the exchange rate goes. The thing is though, the foreign exchange market is highly volatile.

Given this, instead of trying to “time the market”, exchange currencies when a good rate arises. This way, you’ll receive the euro total you need!

5. Keep an eye on the foreign exchange rate with Google.

To keep an eye on the foreign exchange rate, and find out when sterling climbs, you can simply use Google.

Just enter “GBPEUR” into the search engine, and Google will return the current exchange rate, as well as a historical exchange rate graph. This way, you can see if the exchange rate is favourable!

6. Don’t exchange currencies at the “low of the day”.

On a given day, the exchange rate fluctuates. Today, for example, the pound to euro interbank exchange rate has moved almost 0.5 cents!

As a result, to lift your euro total when you move to Spain, ensure you don’t exchange currencies at the “low of the day”. This is the point when the exchange rate is lowest!

7. Transfer your money with a currency broker that’s “FCA authorised.”

To make sure that your money is highly secure when you exchange currencies, use a foreign exchange specialist that’s “directly authorised by the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA.)”

This means that the currency dealer will adhere to all UK regulations to transfer funds, and protect your money!

8. Avoid banks or currency brokers that charge fees or commission.

In 2018, you can transfer your money to Spain while paying 0% in fees or commission. This way, you save the highest possible amount, to lift your euro total in your Spanish bank account!

So, when you speak to a currency broker, ask them to confirm that they charge 0% fees and commission.

9. Get peace of mind with an International Transfer Receipt (ITR).

When you transfer money abroad, you’ll like to know that your money has arrived safely in your Spanish bank account as soon as possible.

To get this peace of mind, ask your foreign exchange broker for an International Transfer Receipt (ITR). With this, you’ll receive quick, clear confirmation that your money transfer has been successful.

10. Protect yourself against volatility, with a forward contract.

To guarantee that you get the euro total you need when you move to Spain with your family, you can set up what’s called a forward contract.

With this, you lock in today’s exchange rate, so you know well in advance what euro total you’ll receive in your Spanish bank account. This way, you’re protected against currency volatility!

cost of living in spain

With these 10 tips in mind, transferring money for your move to Spain will be a cinch. So you’ll enjoy less stress, and more ¡siesta under el sol!

This guest post was written by By Peter Lavelle at foreign exchange broker Pure FX , https://www.purefx.co.uk

Telephone: +44 (0) 1494 671800   Email: peter.lavelle@purefx.co.uk

Further Education In Spain: What are the options for your child?

Further Education in Spain: How To Decide What Options are Right for Your Child

Parents on the Costa del Sol, as in other parts of Spain,  are constantly having to make decisions on their child’s future based on language, suitability for their personality and where you think they will want to live and work when they get older. When you’re considering what further education in Spain path is right for your child, it starts to become more complicated, as the world is their oyster and options are almost endless, however,  they are still young and need your support and assistance.

Further Education In Spain

If you’re debating this decision at the moment, here are some thoughts from the experts at the Schellhammer Business School, the first English-speaking business school in southern Spain, to help guide your thoughts.

When we speak to parents bringing their children up on the Costa del Sol about further education in Spain, they tend to be confused on whether to send them to Spanish Universities, send them abroad to keep their options open or keep them here to study. Of course, no child is the same and so there is no one solution for everyone.

 

So, in this blog post, we want to give you some pros and cons of these three common options. 

Spanish Universities

Pros – There are options both big and small, with most bigger cities in Spain being home to one.

Cons – Teaching style may vary from students who have attended English schools all their life.

Ideal for – Young individuals who are looking to become a lawyer, doctor, dentist or other regulated profession and wanting to practice in Spain only.

UK or US Universities

Pros – The curriculum and teaching style will be familiar for students who have attended English schools all their life.

Cons – Tuition at UK universities have risen substantially over the past years and universities in the US can often cost several 100,000 USD. Moving to another country away from parents as well as starting a new chapter in their education can be too much for many young people and they can struggle without the support network.

Ideal for – Individuals looking to gain a degree in a regulated profession, such as medicine or dentistry to then practice in that country and very independent, confident youngsters with good life skills.

Local Universities teaching in English

Pros – No need to travel abroad or live in an unfamiliar environment and follow a teaching style and curriculum that pupils coming from English educated backgrounds will be familiar with.

Cons – Since they are private and not funded by government, they are fee paying institutions, but there are also scholarships, grants and financial aid that students can apply for.

Ideal for – Young individuals who wish to stay in Spain but gain academic qualifications suitable for business, hospitality and other related fields in social sciences in Spain and abroad.

Further Education In Spain

About the authors

This guest post was written by Evangelos Zographos, Head of Studies at Schellhammer Business School.

Schellhammer Business School offers a range of higher education programmes including a pre-University Foundation Program, undergraduate Bachelor of Business Administration and postgraduate Master of Business Administration aligned and validated via the European Bologna Treaty Norms, as well as an Executive Program. From September, Schellhammer Business School will also be expanding its educational offer with Cambridge International AS & A Levels.

Founded in 2009 and expanding into a stunning new campus in Estepona a year ago, they are the only British accredited business school in Spain that teaches in English. In 2018 they were recognised with the prestigious British accreditation by ASIC (Accreditation Service for International Schools, Colleges and Universities). This is an important accreditation, recognised by the British Government’s Home Office, approved by Ofsted and leading educational bodies in the USA and Europe.

All courses are taught in English and offer a personalized approach to learning, with small class sizes and attention on developing the strength and self-knowledge of the individual. The business school is located on a secure 200-hectare estate featuring an 18-hole golf course, gym, three swimming pools and a unique natural environment.

They are currently accepting applications for the upcoming academic year.

Find out more and apply at www.schellhammerbusinessschool.com or schedule a campus tour by calling (+34) 952907892.

Where Are Brits Buying Property Abroad?

Many people dream of buying property abroad. If you are thinking of doing so, we strongly recommend you do your homework and spend plenty of time carrying out research!

I’m sure you will not be surprised to hear that Spain continues to reign supreme when it comes to Brits looking at buying property abroad. In fact, the country outshines the rest of Europe for enquiries from overseas buyers.

buying property abroad

A whopping 2,513,374 searches are made every month for property in Spain by Britons looking to move to Spain or buy a holiday home here, according to property website Rightmove figures. This figure is 74 per cent more than in France, which is the second- most searched for European country with Italy third and Portugal fourth.

There’s no north-south divide at play here either with Spain being the No 1 sunny destination for people from across the UK including Birmingham, Bristol, Glasgow, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds and London. Incredibly, 54 per cent of searches for Spanish property came from Glasgow with Liverpool coming a close second.

With its relatively mild winters and wall-to-wall sunshine in the summer, it’s no wonder Spain continues to attract UK property buyers. With an average flight time of just over two hours from the UK to Spain, it’s easy enough to fly out for a weekend or head back to the home country to visit family and friends whenever the fancy takes you.

Where to buy in Spain?

The favourite resort for Brits seeking to buy in Spain is Alicante, where the average enquiry price is €126,054 followed by Mallorca, which is much more expensive with an average enquiry price of €397,813 and Malaga is in third place, with an average enquiry price of €191,830.

buying property abroad

What are people looking for in property in Alicante?

Alicante has the lowest average enquiry price in Spain. According to Rightmove’s figures, 62 per cent are searching for villas while 38 per cent are looking for apartments in Alicante. The popular Costa Blanca beaches, golf courses and low-cost flights into Alicante are all great reasons why people want to move here. The property prices are also very reasonable, especially when compared to the second-favourite destination, Mallorca.

As a guide, it is still possible to buy a two-bedroom apartment with communal pool for €45,000 in Torrevieja, south of Alicante. Further north, there is a two-bedroom apartment on Rightmove’s website in Javea for €75.000.

Why do Brits want to Move to Malaga?

Malaga ticks so many boxes for Brits looking for property in southern Spain with its famous Costa del Sol beaches and golf courses as well as the splendid mountain ranges, ski resorts, white villages and Andalusian hospitality. Villas and apartments by the beach or golf courses are popular choices when it comes to buying property in Malaga while the cave houses and little mountain villages are also unique experiences for expats moving abroad.

Property prices vary enormously from resort to resort but you can buy a two-bedroom apartment on the Mijas Costa for €89,000, a a two-bedroom apartment in Malaga city for €127,000 or a charming five-bedroom rural cavehouse for €39,000.

buying property abroad

Is it a good time to buy property in Spain?

It’s always a good time to buy in Spain! Even with the poor exchange rate, you will still get a whole lot more property for your money than in most areas of the UK. Also, many people cannot get a foot on to the property ladder in the UK because of the prices and so could become home-owners in Spain instead. As well as having affordable housing, you’ll also find the cost of living and the quality of life are pretty hot too!

(Read this article: https://movetomalagaspain.com/buy-property-spain/)

 

What to do next about buying your home in Spain?

Take a look around our Family Life in Spain website for useful information about Spain and moving to Spain.
Read all the information in the Move To Malaga website for information and articles about relocating to Malaga and Alicante.

Read our blog about why a second home in Spain could be the best move for you.

CONTACT US  to discover how we can save you time and money and headaches 😉

 

Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart: Book About Spain Giveaway

About Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart, By Alan Cuthbertson

Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart:Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart is the humorous but true story of what happens when the Cuthbertson family decides to sell everything (including the family business), load the family car, and move from England to Spain.

As author Alan Cuthbertson and wife, Heather, begin their move, daughters Ashlie and Stacey have other ideas and take off on their own adventure to Thailand, Australia, and New Zealand. The girls swim with sharks and work in a gold mine, their enthusiasm and naivety shown in the e-mails and texts received by their parents, who themselves are finding Spanish life a very steep learning curve. Who knew fried sparrow was a delicacy? And Alan’s first hunting trip is not a completely successful expedition, but a very funny one.

Competition

Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart:We are giving away 3x copies of Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart in Kindle format and 3 copies in audio format.

For a chance to win answer the following question.

What did Heather pull from her mouth?

(The answer can be found in the excerpt below)

Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart can be purchased from Amazon.

For more information, please visit www.alancuthbertson.com

 

 

Excerpt from: Fiestas and Siestas Miles Apart

Antonio and Encarna are good friends from our village. Antonio is referred to as Lee Van Cleef, getting the nickname after I pointed out his similarity to the spaghetti western star

*****************************

A couple of days later we sat with Van Cleef and his wife Encarna and the conversation got onto the subject of food once again. “Rabbit is my favourite,” confessed Van Cleef.

“I’ve never had rabbit,” admitted Heather.

“Mi casa, Domingo próximo.” Van Cleef’s invitation to Sunday dinner will have been the first time we have eaten with a proper Spanish family in their own home. It was something we looked forward to with mixed emotions.

Not knowing Spanish etiquette for such an occasion, we dressed casually and before leaving the house, selected a bottle of wine to take. “I’ve just remembered. Encarna doesn’t drink and Van Cleef only drinks whiskey,” said Heather, so I swapped the bottle of wine for one of whiskey.

During the short walk to their house, Heather and I mulled over the possible menu.

“He said it was going to be rabbit,” I pointed out.

“I’m just thinking back to the bar when they were all eating sparrows and snails,” Heather said nervously, her nose curling a little.

“We have to eat whatever they put in front of us,” I said, “it would be rude not to.”

We knocked on the door and were greeted by Van Cleef himself. I passed him the bottle of whiskey. He looked at me, then the bottle, then back at me. His expression said, “You have a drink problem my friend.” Inside the house it was quite dark, as most Spanish houses are. Alfonso, Van Cleef’s son, was engrossed in a cartoon on the TV and seemed to be finding it hysterical, a little unusual when you consider he is 19 years old.

We took our positions at the table and right on cue in walked Encarna carrying individual plates full of assorted vegetables and…animal. Heather and I glanced at each other recalling our vow to eat, or at least try, whatever was put in front of us.

Now I know this was to be Heather’s first taste of rabbit, but I just don’t ever remember seeing a rabbit with wings, so presumably some kind of last minute substitution had been made. We all picked up our knives and forks and began to dig in. Encarna saw me pushing the meat around, got up and disappeared in to the kitchen. When she returned she passed me a pair of scissors. “What the hell are these for?” I whispered to Heather. Across the table from me, Alfonso had rejected the knife and fork and was pulling the animal on his plate apart with his fingers, so I did likewise. The wing looked tempting, so I gave it a tug. It came away from the body. Unfortunately, where it had been joined hung the veins and tendons, still dripping with blood and bodily fluids.

“Antonio, no conejo?” Not rabbit? I asked.

“No,” he replied. He then stood up, hooked his thumbs under his armpits and waved his elbows up and down. From this I deduced he was either trying to tell me we were eating bird, or we had progressed on to charades and this was his Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.

Heather, who had been sitting at the side of me throughout the meal, let out a faint squeal that fortunately only I heard. As I turned my head I saw her pulling something from her mouth. Was it a bone? A bit of gristle maybe? Or even a filling? No, it was a piece of buck shot the size of a small rock. “I guess he shot it himself,” I said.

After the main course, a bowl of fruit was brought from the kitchen, and Heather selected a pear and took her first bite. “No, No,” called Encarna thrusting a knife toward Heather.

“I think she wanted the pear,” I said a little worried. As it transpires, the knife was to peel the pear, as they never eat the skins of fruits concerned about what they may have been sprayed with.

As we said our goodbyes I returned the invitation and promised that next time they would have to come to our house for a meal. Van Cleef turned his nose up and curled his top lip. A rough translation of what he said would be. “I don’t think so; I don’t eat that English muck.”

 

Send your answer to:  cuthbertsons@hotmail.com

 

Check out our selection of Books About Spain in this post: Books About Spain

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