Relocating To Spain? Tips To Oversee A Seamless Move

Any type of relocation can be exciting, but moving abroad is a particularly exhilarating prospect. It’s natural to approach a move with a mixture of trepidation and enthusiasm, especially when you think about the stresses of packing and organising logistics, but there are steps you can take to make life easier. Here is a handy guide to help you oversee a seamless move. 

Relocating To Spain

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Finding somewhere to live

The first task to tick off your list when moving to Spain is to find somewhere to live. You may want to rent a house or an apartment while you find a permanent home, or you may prefer to buy a home to move straight into when you relocate. Explore both options and figure out where you want to put down roots. Consider locations based on where you plan to work or what kind of job you have, your lifestyle preferences and your budget. Spain is a country that caters to everyone and you can choose to enjoy city life, escape to the peace and tranquillity of the countryside or embrace outdoor living by the coast. Start narrowing down your options and use filters to find properties that match your wish list criteria. It’s wise to use virtual tours and to browse listings online before you arrange viewings. If you’re hoping to get over to Spain before you move to see properties, you’ll have a shortlist ready and you can visit agents to add any other properties that fit the bill. 

 

Learning the language

It’s not possible to learn a language in a matter of days or weeks, but if you’re counting down the days until you move to Spain, it’s a great idea to try to learn some simple phrases and common vocabulary. There are various options to explore, including taking beginner classes at home, learning Spanish online through sites like Memrise and hiring a tutor. If you have friends or family members who speak Spanish, you could also ask them to help you learn some words and phrases before you relocate. You can also watch TV programmes in Spanish with English subtitles and use activities and exercises to hone your speaking and reading and writing skills. Once you get to Spain, and you’re immersed in the culture and people around you are talking Spanish, you’ll find it easier to pick up common phrases, improve your accent and expand your vocabulary. 

 

Building friendships

It can be daunting to leave family and friends behind and embark upon a new adventure, but technology has made it possible to make friends and build relationships without actually meeting people in person. When you know where you are moving, look for community groups and social media accounts you can join or follow to meet families living in the area and get to know people before you move. Being sociable online can also help you access practical information and useful tips to make your move simpler. You might want to ask about schools or colleges, local amenities or how to set up a bank account, for example. People who know the ropes and have experience of relocating can help you. 

Relocating To Spain

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Relocating to Spain is an incredibly exciting prospect, but it’s natural to be stressed or a little anxious before a big move. If you’re preparing for a new adventure, take these tips on board!

Moving to Spain: 4 Simple Ways to Help Your Child Cope

Before moving to Spain with your family, it is essential to know how best to help your child dig in and transition. This guide will provide you with four simple ways that will help ensure that your child is happy and prosperous in their new life in Spain.

moving to spain with kids

Discuss with your Children About the Move

It is essential to let your child know you will move to Spain. You want them to know that the new home they will move into is unique for everyone. It would help if you discussed the reasons for the move, so your children can feel at ease. A more straightforward way of describing it is by saying that you are on an adventure. Your children will benefit from this information as it helps them understand why things may seem different.

Pack and Ship Before You Move

You will want to ensure that your child’s room has plenty of their belongings, but you will also want to make sure you don’t pack everything until they arrive. Pack and ship most of your child’s belongings to Spain before you arrive. It helps your child feel like they already have many things with them when they get here. It can frustrate a child if their clothes and toys are still in boxes even after they’ve moved into a new house.

Give your Child New Exploring Opportunities

When you arrive in Spain, please encourage your child to explore their new home and surroundings. When they are out exploring, have a map of the area so your child can become familiar with their surroundings and to help them easily find their way back home.

Since it is a new area, take all precautions necessary to ensure that they are safe. You may choose to appoint someone to accompany them as they explore the new location. Better yet, to be safe, you can track your child’s cell phone without having to install any tracking app; you can read the guide here.

Language Classes

Once you arrive and settle, get your child involved in language classes. These language classes will give them the tools to continue to learn and pick up additional phrases and vocabulary about Spain and themselves.

The teacher can also be constructive in this process as they will try to decipher how your child learns. It is helpful because they will find a method to help your child keep learning and comprehending things better.

Conclusion

When you take these steps to help your child adjust to their new home in Spain, they will feel right at home. Your child will feel like they belong wherever you live, and it will show in their behavior and lifestyle.

You want them to flourish in this new environment, so the extra time and effort you put into getting them to acclimate to the new location are worth it. As a parent, you want them to thrive wherever they are. Spain is great for kids to live and grow up in, so make it work for your family.

Your Garden in Spain: Tips for Tidying Up

One of the chores that you should have on your list right now is the one where you clear out your garden in preparation for the season ahead. It may still be a place to capture winter sun, but plants in Spain still go through cycles in temperature. A seasonal cleanup is always good for your garden, and whether you call in an expert or you do it yourself, your cleanup is going to be a great thing to do to keep your plants and your lawns healthy.

Garden clean-ups prevent pests from building up, weeds from strangling your good plants and it makes your home look tidy – which is exactly what you want. You can clear out the garden and enjoy a newly blooming space, because you’ve taken the time to clear up. If you need some new parts for your garden tools, you can get those replaced before you wrap your things up into the garage or shed for the season. Clearing out the garden shouldn’t be a huge issue but it should be done so that you don’t have to worry about it anymore! Let’s take a look at the tips you need to get it right.

your garden in spain

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Steps for tidying up your garden in Spain:

  1. Removing the pests. Disease and pests can eat through your garden and make it look awful, kill your plants and cause infestations you really could do without. The first tip for cleaning out the garden is to sort your pest issues out and call in an exterminator for those pesky bugs that just won’t let go! 
  2. Maintain your compost pile. You don’t want to have any issues when it comes to your compost, so make sure that you prevent mold growth and seeds from blooming in your compost bin. Re-line the bin and make sure that the lid stays firmly closed. You can spread the compost over your perennial plants and feed them nutrients along the way. It protects from weed growth, too!
  3. Clear up the vegetable patch in your garden if you have the chance. You want to know that your vegetables can thrive and grow without being strangled by weeds and that means raking, pulling back, and clearing off dead leaves. The compost can keep them looking good for springtime, and that’s what you want for your plants.

How To Get Settled Into Your New Home & Location

Moving to a new location and into a different house is a significant change and may cause you some anxiety or worry initially. While it can be an exciting time in your life, it’s also probably a bit nerve-wracking.

What will help ease your emotions is to take actions that will help get you settled into your new home and location as soon as possible. The following ideas will ensure that you feel comfortable getting acquainted with your new surroundings and that you can make your new house a home.

 

Unpack Your Boxes & Get Organized

One step for getting settled into your new home after you relocate is to unpack your boxes. Get organized by finding places to store all your items and making sure your home is clear of any clutter. Leaving your boxes packed and a mess around your home may make you feel more stressed out than usual. Go through your items and figure out where you want to store all you own and get organized so you can find what you’re looking for at a later date. The reason you want to get unpacked and organized is so you can start decorating and feeling comfortable in your new space.

 

work in spain

Look into Job Opportunities

When you move you may also be starting over with your career and professional aspirations. You may want to find full-time work or maybe you decide you want to Find courier jobs on Shiply that you can take on in your free time or when the kids are in school. Either way, you’ll want to discover ways to earn money or an income and how to support your family in your new location. Working will give you purpose and help you get more familiar with the area.

Get into A Routine & Schedule

It’s also in your best interest to get into a regular routine or schedule shortly after moving into a new home and location. Get settled by figuring out how you want your days to unfold and making sure everyone is on the same page about how the days are going to go. Avoid letting your move bog down and disrupt your life too much. Show your kids and family that while moving may have been a slight disruption to your life, that you can soon get back into the swing of things and enjoy your new location.

Explore the Community

You can get settled into your new home and area by exploring the community. Get out there and meet new people and your neighbours. Figure out the best places to eat and where you can shop to buy new clothes or items you need. Work on building a local support group and getting to know others in the area so you can be there for one another and have friends to spend time with. You can increase your emotional well-being and satisfaction with your home life by engaging with those in your area and getting more involved in the local community. 

Where are the Best, Safest and Cheapest Places to Live in Spain?

places to live in spain

One of the biggest questions when planning to relocate to Spain is where, exactly, you should choose to live. Of course, this is subjective depending on exactly what you want out of your move, but we have nevertheless tried to narrow down some of the best places to live in Spain for ex-pats.

As well as suggesting what we think are some of the nicest places to live in Spain, we’ve also tried to point out some of the cheapest for those planning a move on a budget, and will also discuss whether or not you need to pay for a Spain work visa if planning to take up employment. 

Secondary Education in Spain

Where is the best place for British families to live in Spain?

We might be a bit biased on this, but we truly believe that one of the best villages to live in Spain for Brits is Mijas Pueblo in the Malaga province.

It not only provides easy access to the extensive coastline and beautiful beaches of the Costa del Sol and the famous whitewashed villages in the region, but it’s also close to the Montes de Málaga Natural Park.

If you’re planning on moving to Spain with family, you can also rest assured that there plenty of great educational facilities for kids in the area, both at private and state-run schools.

Of course, if you’re a city kid at heart, you might not be so eager to give up the hustle and bustle and move to the coast. In that case, a great alternative option is the beautiful cosmopolitan city of Valencia, one of the most popular metropolitan areas for British ex-pats in Spain.

Some other great destinations worth considering if you’re moving to Spain include:

  • Alicante, especially the stunning Costa Blanca coast
  • Malaga, Marbella, and Alhaurin el Grande, all on the Costa del Sol
  • Oviedo in Asturias considered the cleanest city in Spain
  • Madrid, which boasts a large ex-pat community

If your main reason for moving to the country is the ample sunshine, you might consider relocating to the Canary Islands. The capital, Gran Canaria, is the warmest place in Spain in the winter and has the best climate year-round.

Best places to live in Spain as an American

While Brits tend to favour the Costa del Sol and the Costa Blanca areas, if you’re planning to move to Spain from the US then you’ll find most of your fellow American ex-pats living in the two biggest cities, Madrid and Barcelona.

Madrid, with its vibrant culture, large green spaces, and excellent international schools, is a particular favourite among Americans who live in Spain as an ex-pat, although those who like to have a beach and the seaside close by tend to favour Barcelona.

If you’re only planning to stay for a short time in the country, these cities are also probably the best places to live in Spain for a month or two, as they provide the biggest samples of Spanish cultures.

inland costa del sol

What is the safest city in Spain?

Barcelona and Madrid are also considered among the safest places to live in Spain and are in fact regarded as among the safest in Europe.

However, if the large amount of tourist interest in these major cities doesn’t really appeal to you, there are plenty of charming coastal towns that are just as safe (or safer!).

Some of the best small towns to live in Spain along the country’s coast include Altafulla in Catalonia, Ribadesella in Asturias, and Salobreña in Granada.

What is the cheapest city to live in Spain?

If you’re relocating to Spain on a tight budget, the living costs in your destination may be one of the biggest factors in your decision. Luckily, there are plenty of cheap places to live in Spain that are equally as pleasant and pretty.

For example, Seville, the capital of Andalusia, is often considered the cheapest city to live in Spain, and it is a positively gorgeous place with beautiful historic architecture.

Other places in Spain where the overall cost of living is low include:

  • Granada
  • Alicante
  • A Coruña
  • Cordoba
  • Las Palmas
  • Pamplona
  • Vigo
  • Valladolid

Saying this, the cost of living will vary for everyone no matter where in Spain you choose to relocate. It’s always possible to get by on a budget in most places if you inform yourself of the cheapest neighbourhoods to live in beforehand.

swimming pool mijas

 

How to Live in Spain for Free

The good news for Brits planning to move to Spain is that, as EU citizens, they do not currently need to pay any visa or permit fees, although this may well change if you’re moving to Spain after Brexit.

If you’re planning to live in Spain for more than 3 consecutive months, however, you’ll have to register as a foreign resident and pay a small fee to get a resident’s permit at a local police station.

Once you register for residency and begin contributing to social security, or are retiring in Spain, you and your family members will also able to use Spain’s public healthcare free of charge. But that my friends, is an article for another day …

 

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